Jewels, Boots and Life Outside the Box

8 02 2009

Last night I saw my first live performance of a Balanchine piece. George Balanchine is considered to be the father of American ballet and he is by far my favorite choreographer. Our Seattle ballet company, Pacific Northwest Ballet, has several of his pieces on the docket for this season. Jewels is the only full-length of his that they are doing.

Jewels is a plot-less ballet in three acts and was the first of its’ kind. The first act is “Emeralds”, a romantic and ultra-simple piece. The second act is “Rubies” which is jazzy and bright and the most “American” of the three. The program dubbed it “neoclassical”. The third and last is “Diamonds”, a truly classical and stunning piece. It is an indication of the level of demand placed on Balanchine’s dancers that no dancer appeared in more than one piece. (An almost unbelievable feat when you see the size of the ensemble for “Diamonds”.)

The most obvious favorite of the evening would be Rubies. I think most would choose it of all the acts. It’s vivacious and acrobatic and funny. Funny ballet doesn’t happen often and is worth remarking upon. Diamonds is so visually captivating- truly stunning beauty- that the aesthetic would probably choose it as the favorite. My favorite, though, was far and away Emeralds.

Emeralds put into a visual form what I think love should be like. It’s a pas de deux where you dance not only with your partner but alone. The women’s beauty is accentuated by her partner as she is lifted and spun and held. The man is given grace and focus and extension of line that he could not obtain alone. Call it an overly romanticized view of what is, after all, just a dance, but I think Balanchine would have said very similar things about the piece.

The entire experience was magical and fun and completely enjoyable.

——–

This brings us up to today.
“So Meghan, what did you do today?”
“Well, I woke up, refused to talk to my sister (I wasn’t all the way awake), went to the mall with Mom and Lynn, followed the aforementioned pair around, spilled my guts, ate trout and bought the world’s most expensive boots. Later I went to work, watched Sense and Sensibility with my mom and ate cake. That was pretty much my day.”
“You spilled your guts?”
“Yes. My mother and Lynn now know things about me that no-one else does. Not suprising since they could have told me most of it before I even said it, but it was good anyway.”
“And you bought boots?”
Italian boots.”
“They couldn’t have really been THAT expensive.”
“They were. Did I mention the words Italian and handmade?”
“Don’t you feel that it is an irresponsible way to spend money when you have so many trips coming up?”
“I feel like God said it was ok. It was almost like He was daring me to trust Him with my finances. Also, He is working on me feeling ok with liking very nice things.”
“So you are keeping the boots?”
“Yes, I think I am.”
“Anything else interesting happen today?”
“It was fairly non-eventful at work. The most exciting thing that happened there is that my best friend called me. I’m going to call her back tomorrow and have a good chat.”
“Can you think of any additional tid-bit to share with our viewing audience?”
“Well… I would just tell them to be purposeful about living outside their box. Also that God is good and He is in a good mood. Also to write a poem today. It’s a good day for poetry.”
“Thank you so much for being with us here today.”
“Well thank you for having me! It’s been a pleasure.”
“Ladies and Gentlemen this has been Life With Meghan. Join us again soon for Meghan’s feelings on tattoos, socks and the use of albino lemurs in the domestic production of fine footwear.”

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2 responses

9 02 2009
Jennifer James

I don’t care if they were made with the underbellies of endangered baby rhinos’, their gorgeous! And, the right size to share. :- )

Perhaps we could become the sisterhood of the traveling boots?

9 02 2009
granny the great

yep- you need your own column!

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